Vulcans Doing Things
We have been cast to Earth to conjure a series of humanoid social experiments, we have created this cyber space to keep an account of our progressions in the human society.
Here starts the accounts of Asil and T'Aleris.
acciosmaug:

LLAP

acciosmaug:

LLAP

astronomicalwonders:

The Trifid Nebula - M20
The massive star factory known as the Trifid Nebula was captured in all its glory with the Wide-Field Imager camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The nebula is named after the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, the Trifid Nebula is a rare combination of three nebulae types that reveal the fury of freshly formed stars and point to more star birth in the future.
Credit: ESO/MPG

astronomicalwonders:

The Trifid Nebula - M20

The massive star factory known as the Trifid Nebula was captured in all its glory with the Wide-Field Imager camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The nebula is named after the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, the Trifid Nebula is a rare combination of three nebulae types that reveal the fury of freshly formed stars and point to more star birth in the future.

Credit: ESO/MPG

/star trek theme playing/

complisults-and-explanabrags:

I have been, and always shall be, your friend. Live long and prosper.

I didn’t mean to do it but I managed to sync up the hand drops

herchnsn:

If you would clarify, Minister, to what disadvantage are you referring?

distant-traveller:

A galaxy with a glowing heart

This view, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a nearby spiral galaxy known as NGC 1433. At about 32 million light-years from Earth, it is a type of very active galaxy known as a Seyfert galaxy — a classification that accounts for 10% of all galaxies. They have very bright, luminous centres comparable to that of our galaxy, the Milky Way.
Galaxy cores are of great interest to astronomers. The centres of most, if not all, galaxies are thought to contain a supermassive black hole, surrounded by a disc of infalling material.
NGC 1433 is being studied as part of a survey of 50 nearby galaxies known as the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). Ultraviolet radiation is observed from galaxies, mainly tracing the most recently formed stars. In Seyfert galaxies, ultraviolet light is also thought to emanate from the accretion discs around their central black holes. Studying these galaxies in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum is incredibly useful to study how the gas is behaving near the black hole. This image was obtained using a mix of ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light.
LEGUS will study a full range of properties from a sample of galaxies, including their internal structure. This Hubble survey will provide a unique foundation for future observations with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). ALMA has already caught unexpected results relating to the centre of NGC 1433, finding a surprising spiral structure in the molecular gas close to the centre of NGC 1433. The astronomers also found a jet of material flowing away from the black hole, extending for only 150 light-years — the smallest such molecular outflow ever observed in a galaxy beyond our own.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgements: D. Calzetti (UMass) and the LEGUS Team

distant-traveller:

A galaxy with a glowing heart

This view, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a nearby spiral galaxy known as NGC 1433. At about 32 million light-years from Earth, it is a type of very active galaxy known as a Seyfert galaxy — a classification that accounts for 10% of all galaxies. They have very bright, luminous centres comparable to that of our galaxy, the Milky Way.

Galaxy cores are of great interest to astronomers. The centres of most, if not all, galaxies are thought to contain a supermassive black hole, surrounded by a disc of infalling material.

NGC 1433 is being studied as part of a survey of 50 nearby galaxies known as the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). Ultraviolet radiation is observed from galaxies, mainly tracing the most recently formed stars. In Seyfert galaxies, ultraviolet light is also thought to emanate from the accretion discs around their central black holes. Studying these galaxies in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum is incredibly useful to study how the gas is behaving near the black hole. This image was obtained using a mix of ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light.

LEGUS will study a full range of properties from a sample of galaxies, including their internal structure. This Hubble survey will provide a unique foundation for future observations with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). ALMA has already caught unexpected results relating to the centre of NGC 1433, finding a surprising spiral structure in the molecular gas close to the centre of NGC 1433. The astronomers also found a jet of material flowing away from the black hole, extending for only 150 light-years — the smallest such molecular outflow ever observed in a galaxy beyond our own.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgements: D. Calzetti (UMass) and the LEGUS Team

sci-universe:

This is a new composite image which shows "fireworks" caused by a black hole in a nearby galaxy NGC 4258 (also known as M106). It features X-rays from Chandra (blue), radio waves from the VLA (purple), optical data from Hubble (yellow and blue), and infrared with Spitzer (red).
NGC 4258 is a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way, but it’s famous for something that our Galaxy doesn’t have – two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical, and radio light. These features, or anomalous arms, are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but instead intersect with it. There has now been made a new study by Patrick Ogle, Lauranne Lanz and Philip Appleton from the California Institute of Technology which is explaining those spectacles. Radio shows that the supermassive black hole at the center of NGC 4258 is producing powerful jets of high-energy particles, and researchers think that these jets strike the disk of the galaxy and generate shock waves. (Full article here»)

sci-universe:

This is a new composite image which shows "fireworks" caused by a black hole in a nearby galaxy NGC 4258 (also known as M106). It features X-rays from Chandra (blue), radio waves from the VLA (purple), optical data from Hubble (yellow and blue), and infrared with Spitzer (red).

NGC 4258 is a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way, but it’s famous for something that our Galaxy doesn’t have – two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical, and radio light. These features, or anomalous arms, are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but instead intersect with it.
There has now been made a new study by Patrick Ogle, Lauranne Lanz and Philip Appleton from the California Institute of Technology which is explaining those spectacles. Radio shows that the supermassive black hole at the center of NGC 4258 is producing powerful jets of high-energy particles, and researchers think that these jets strike the disk of the galaxy and generate shock waves. (Full article here»)


star trek screencap meme → 25-27/??

star trek screencap meme 25-27/??

What do you think of space in general?
from Anonymous

By ‘in general’ I assume you mean a brief summary of our universal view with very little scientific explanation involved. Very well. ‘Space’ is wide conjure of inconceivable potential and mystery beyond what science and logic has grazed the surface of, yet within lies the promise of what we’ve yet to (discover). We are all a part of a much greater existence of planetary life, our own life is simply a fragment in what lay beyond. 

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